We Proudly Accept

Welcome to Spys Safety Products!

My Cart:

0 item(s) - $0.00
You have no items in your shopping cart.

0

Pepper Shot Pepper Spray

Items 1 to 9 of 36 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4

Grid  List 

Items 1 to 9 of 36 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4

Grid  List 

Question: Is pepper spray legal?

Answer: In the majority of states, yes, one is allowed to legally possess and carry pepper spray. However, we highly recommend that, before purchasing pepper spray, you confirm that it is legal in your state by checking in with your local law enforcement office for any state regulations regarding pepper spray. This is because, in some states, there are specific pepper spray restrictions, such as the age one is allowed to possess and carry pepper spray, as well as the size of pepper spray one is allowed possess, etc.

 

Question: What does “OC” in pepper spray stand for?

Answer: The concentrated agent found in pepper spray is called Oleoresin Capsicum. Oleoresin Capsicum is extracted from chili peppers and is the chemical that gives peppers their hot quality. That is why it is called pepper spray. Also, Oleoresin Capsicum is known as “OC” for short. That is why pepper spray is commonly referred to as OC pepper spray.

 

Question: Are all pepper sprays the same?

Answer: No, all pepper sprays are not the same. Pepper sprays are rated in two ways: Percentage of Oleoresin Capsicum in the agent itself, and the “hotness” of the spray, which is measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHU’s). The percentage of OC has nothing to do with the SHU rating, and vice versa.

One of the biggest misconceptions about pepper spray is that the higher the OC percentage, the hotter and more effective the spray. In most cases, this could not be further from the truth. The best, fastest incapacitating pepper sprays in the world are from 2% to 10% OC. The lighter the fluid, the faster is penetrates the membranes.

So, the percentage of OC is important, but even more important is the SHU rating, as the percentage has nothing to do with the actual SHU rating or “hotness” of the spray.

A pepper spray with 2,000,000 SHU’s is twice as hot as a pepper spray with 1,000,000 SHU’s.

By the way, 2,000,000 SHU’s is a substantial rating for an effective pepper spray.

 

Question: What are the main physical effects of Pepper Shot pepper spray?

Answer: Pepper Shot pepper spray (as well as other pepper sprays) has four physiological effects that may be experienced:

1. Eyes: tearing, involuntary closing or complete closing due to dilation of the eye capillaries. Eyes will appear red/bloodshot for 30 to 60 minutes. People wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses will be equally affected.

2. Respiratory System: immediate inflammation, including swelling of the throat lining which can restrict the airway size. Respiratory functions return to normal within 10 to 45 minutes. The airway will be open enough to allow for sufficient oxygen flow for survival. Due to the reduced airway flow, the person will probably not receive enough oxygen to continue fighting or other sustained physical exertion. Temporary paralysis of the larynx. Uncontrollable coughing, retching, and gasping for air with a gagging sensation in the throat.

3. Effect on the skin: inflammation of the exposed skin with a burning sensation.

4. Effects on muscle coordination: pepper spray exposure may cause a person to lose balance due to the effect of pepper spray on vision.

 

Question: How long does Pepper Shot pepper spray typically last?

Answer: The expiration date may vary according to the manufacturer, Pepper Shot pepper spray generally has a 2 year shelf life. Most of the time, the expiration date is stamped on the canister of the pepper spray, so check to confirm its shelf life. You may find that the “spray” function still works after the expiration date of the pepper spray has passed—we still highly recommend that you replace your pepper spray, as it is the potency of the pepper spray that has expired. As such, to ensure your safety and the efficiency of the pepper spray as a self-defense weapon, it is wise to replace your pepper spray before the expiration date passes.

 

Question: How do I use pepper spray to its utmost potential?

Answer: It is very important that you get some training and practice with the specific spray you are going to carry. Study the canister, the nozzle, and the dispenser. You can train yourself at home with a few simple tips. How to practice with outdoor targets Print out a few copies of a person's face. Tack the print on a tree or fence, equivalent to a person about 6 feet tall. Stand several feet away and practice firing at the target in one second bursts. Make sure to try and aim directly between the eyes. The pepper spray will affect all the mucous membranes and even the exposed skin, but you want your attacker's eyes to immediately close. In an emergency situation, make sure you have distance between you and the attacker. Don't get within their grabbing distance. Don’t threaten an attacker with your spray. Fire 2 or 3 second bursts directly into the eyes of the attacker. If it is not working, give them another two seconds. The small pocket or purse size will give you between 5 and 10 seconds of continual fire. Once the threat is stopped, run immediately and call the police. If your spray contains UV dye, tell the police that. It can help the police to identify your attacker. There is also a Pepper Spray Training book that has plenty of tips on effectively using pepper spray.

 

Question: How should I store and carry my pepper spray?

Answer: Store your defensive spray in a safe place at room temperature. Keep it away from children. Do not leave it in your car during summer because high temperatures may cause the seals to leak. Think in advance how you want to carry your pepper spray. In a typical assault, you get no warnings and you will get attacked when you least expect it. Carry your pepper spray with you whenever possible, and keep it in the same place. You can put it in a loose outer pocket of a jacket or inside a pants pocket, or in a purse with an open pocket. Try a few different carrying methods and find good accessible locations for you. Practice and make sure you can draw it quickly in an emergency situation.